Temporal-Clutter

Just Say NO!

Do you feel overwhelmed? Are you experiencing that feeling of too much to do and not enough time to do it in? If you are just too busy, consider a catchphrase from the 1980’s, just say NO!

Say no to things and people that are keeping you from fulfilling your goals. Decide what is important to you each day, and act accordingly inasmuch as you are able to do so. That is, declutter the time wasters from your day.

Granted, we all have family, work, and other obligations that we must attend to each day. But think about items in your day that you might be able to delegate, or not do at all. Often we get so caught up in our daily activities that we are living on autopilot, and not really questioning the need for doing a given task.

Consider the various euphemisms for how we use time:
Temporal-Clutter
Work expands to fill the time allowed.
Time flies when you are having fun.
There are only 24 hours in a day.
Time marches on.

These imply that we cannot control our time. While it is true that all of us have the same 168 hours each week, we can control how at least some of that time is utilized.

How can you avoid temporal clutter?

In STUFFology 101: Get Your Mind Out of the Clutter we talk about temporal clutter this way, “When you feel your time is limited, look at your daily activities. Sometimes we fill our lives with activities and feel overwhelmed by how busy we are.”

Just say NO to some of those activities.

The key is to work on those things that are the most important to you, while eliminating those that are not. This may sound simplistic. But it is the simple and obvious that often must be re-learned when we are in the autopilot mode of daily living. Stop and ask yourself, “Do I really need to do this?” The answer may surprise you.

Time is a precious resource. Think hard about how you can declutter time wasters from your day. Make it a daily practice to just say NO to things and people that are keeping you from fulfilling your goals.

1 reply
  1. avatar
    Brenda Avadian, MA says:

    True. Very True, Eric.
    After “saying NO,” to subscription TV. my mind feels more focused on those TO-Do items that are set aside and accumulate, day after day. In one or two hours each night, I feel the mental clutter (a jumble mess of thoughts, often the result of a night of TV viewing) dissipating.
    Making time to focus on what needs doing also means less temporal clutter–that is, feeling too many To Do items crowding a too-short period of time.
    For instance, last night, while hubby suffered through our tax preparations for the accountant, I shred one of those piles of overwhelming paperwork (POOP) and even processed a small pile of Toastmasters officer-related paperwork.
    What a relief to see two empty spaces created after shredding the POOP and processing the paperwork.
    Yep, my vote is: Yes, to saying NO. 😉

Comments are closed.